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SusanDolphinDelaney

Healing and Empowerment for Women

Tag Archives: Earrings Everyday

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Every month Erin Prais Hintz of Earrings Everyday ( http://www.earrings-everyday.blogspot.com) gives us a challenge to make earrings according to the theme of the month.

This month she gave us art prints of tide pools as our inspiration.

My first pair of earrings, above, was created using the Mokume Gane technique, derived from an ancient Japanese sword making scheme. The “white bubbles” are wonderfully translucent on sunny days.

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My second pair used the same clay, but I manipulated it according to Lynda Mosley’s controlled marbling technique.

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The third pair used the same clay again. This time I punched small circles from the clay and added denim colored button pearls.

I enjoyed making these. They will become a Christmas gift for my beautiful blue-eyed sister-in-law. Shhhh!

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(The Art Bead Scene post is one click down)

Every month Erin Prais-Hintz gives us an amazing design challenge. The challenges have ranged from photos of dragonflies, to short movies and this month: Architecture.

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When I saw this building, and the others in the challenge, I knew I had to make earrings with Dinosaur Bone. And not just any Dinosaur Bone, Opalized Dinosaur Bone.

In medical school I learned that the hip bone is “spongy” inside. It is not solid bone but has “trabeculae”, long arches of bone in its spongy core. The arches are virtually identical to the arches architects have used over the centuries to create the supports for cathedrals and for modern buildings like the one above.

If you are a nerd like me, you are going “duh” because the laws of physics apply equally to supporting bone and supporting the roofs of buildings.

Here is an X-ray of a hip bone. The image is reversed, so the bone shows black. Do you see the swooping, curved lines?

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Here is a drawing that shows the lines that support the bone:

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If you go to http://www.earrings-everyday.blogspot.com and look at all of the photos Erin posted, YOU WILL SEE THESE SAME LINES AND CURVES IN THE LOAD-BEARING WALLS OF EVERY ONE OF THE BUILDINGS in the challenge.

I am in year two of a five year plan to create gorgeous polymer clay opals.

When Erin posted the April Challenge, I had just seen this photo of Opalized Dinosaur Bone and pinned it to my “Opals to Polymerize” Pinterest board.

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This fossil is a tiny piece of a dinosaur bone, so you don’t see the swooping lines we’d see if we had an X-ray of the dinosaur’s whole hip bone.

Here are the earrings I made:

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I really had fun making these. I created two shades of green opal, two of blue and one of violet. I mixed tiny shreds of these colors into five different color combinations. I wrapped the green ones in Raw Umber Premo and the blue ones in Burnt Umber. If you look closely you can see how this enhanced the natural, organic feel to the piece.

The opal clay sparkles and twinkles just like mineral opal.

I used dyed jade beads as drops below the Opalized Dinosaur Bone. It’s translucency enhances the mineral feel to the earrings.

Here is another shot. The photo finishing to bring up the sparkle of the opal made my hands look a bit blue.

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Join me on a trip down memory lane:

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This is one of my early pieces, a pendant of Fossilized Dinosaur Bone, in this case the spaces in the spongy bone of the dinosaur filled with the mineral Apatite, Fools’ Gold. This is my interpretation in polymer. I have one of these available to sell. Message me at http://www.susandolphindelaney.etsy.com if you are interested.

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This piece, a small pendant, is very dear to me. The green clay is my very first successful batch of opal clay. I’d been playing with a technique which hadn’t worked and I was processing the clay so that I could turn it into Beads of Courage for kids with cancer, and voila, there it was. I had discovered the next step in making beautiful opals from polymer.

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This is another pendant, from my second batch of opal clay. I’d seen an amazing fossil: Opalized Snakeskin, in these colors. I had to try to make it.

Thanks for following my journey.

I am so grateful to Erin for creating these challenges. I always enjoy them, but I must say the deep nerdyness involved in this one kept a grin on my face the whole time I worked.

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