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SusanDolphinDelaney

Healing and Empowerment for Women

Category Archives: Japanese Garden

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Each month earring artist Erin Prais-Hintz of Earrings Everyday challenges us to create earrings based on a prompt. This month her prompt was a film showing a kinetic sculpture “Breaking Wave” by Plebeian Design. You can see this amazing sculpture prompt at http://www.earrings-everyday.blogspot.com.

When I was a girl, growing up in DC, Mother would pack me a sack lunch and pin two car tokens to my blouse collar and off I’d go to the museums on the National Mall. Natural History was my favorite. I stood at the rim of the Foucault pendulum and watched it for a LONG TIME as it traced its mark in the sand on the floor below it.

I made these earrings to honor that experience. I hung Swarovski crystals from thin gold-plated chains. I created a Damascus cane from many shades of faded denim to echo the pendulums tracings in the sand. The Damascus cane is modeled after a Japanese sword makers technique.

These earrings will be listed in my new Etsy shop SusanDolphinDelaney on January 1, its grand opening!

In SusanDolphinDelaney I will offer earrings and earring components made me by from my polymer clay opals and from my polymer minerals.

My interest in minerals developed, as you have already guessed, during my childhood solo trips to the Museum of Natural History in DC. The Hall of Minerals was a place that I spent HOURS as a girl. In fact, my interest in crystals, fostered there, inspired the science fair project that led to the scholarships that allowed me to go to college!

Now that I have completed my degrees in Chemistry, Physiology and Medicine, I can take the time to study Geology and make wonderful earrings and earring components for you.

COMING SOON

The background of the photo above is taken from one of the polymer clay opals I made:

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My shop will have a selection of polymer clay discs in my Monet series:

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Some discs made from my Madam Pele polymer clay, which glows from across the room, just like real embers:

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There will be pocket-sized touchstone goddesses like this Madam Pele one:

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And finally, more discs from opal clay:

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The first pair of earring components is made from shimmering peacock opal clay. The second pair from a stunning mixture of white, black, gray and violet opal clays. It is fairly translucent. The third, a set of disks I made from a mixture of three yellow opal clays, white and a tiny bit of black opal clay is wonderfully translucent. I plan to pair it with some leaf charms from Suburban Girl Studios on Etsy.

If you want, you can hop over to my empty Etsy shop now and favorite it, so that you can revisit it on January 1, the grand opening. http://www.susandolphindelaney.etsy.com

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Ever since I was a girl I have been fascinated by the art of Japan.

I have done Japanese flower arranging, ikebana. I am also an internationally known and published haiku poet.

A few years ago, I took up painting enso, circles, with sumi paint. I bought wonderful, flat porcelain trays of the sumi ink at the gift shop at Nepenthe, in Big Sur, CA. I drew a number of enso to illustrate some of my haiku. Yesterday, I photographed the enso.

The one above, one of my favorites, is made by dipping the soft rabbit’s hair brush into both metallic gold and metallic silver and then brushing the circle in one breath.

I find it meaningful that haiku are also one breath poems.

Both art forms remind us that we have only the now. To live in the now.

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I painted this one to illustrate a poem about peeling an orange.

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This one will illustrate poems about the sun.

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And this one the moon.

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This one was drawn to illustrate the moon rising behind pine trees, but this morning I used it to illustrate this haiku: lipstick on his collar/ thunder/ rattles the bedsprings.

I hope you like my enso!

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My daughter and I visited the Japanese Garden in Fort Worth this morning. Expecting another searing day, we planned to leave at 8 a.m. to enjoy the garden in the cool of the morning. We were delighted to find the region blanketed with cloud and a steady, gentle rain falling.

We had wonderful sharing on the 50 mile trip over. Once in the garden, the rain still falling steadily, we went and stood in the covered area surrounding the bed of raked sand with its islands made of lichened boulders. We stood and talked for 20 minutes, continuing our deep sharing.

Courageously we moved out into the garden. We were delighted to see the rain lightly hammering the surface of the upper pond. It had always been so still on previous visits. We walked past the spot where we’d spent 15 minutes an arm’s length from a great blue heron, still enjoying the memory of that day.

We stepped up onto the porch of the tea house on the lower pond and enjoyed being out of the rain but still deeply in contact with it. We watched, enthralled, as silver droplets of water collected on the surface of heart shaped leaves, tiny droplets joining the larger, until, at last, the large droplet slid off of the leaf.

Later we sat in a gazebo, right on the water, and enjoyed the sight and sound of the rain pattering into the pond. I shared that I often visited a shelter in the park near my girlhood home and sat in a picnic shelter, listening to the sound of rain or snow falling. I called it the Rainsnow.

More deep conversation in a shelter high above the pond, then back to a dry bench near the raked sand.

We lunched at the Modern Museum of Art. I had a fresh tomato tart made with real tomatoes, homemade mayonnaise, homemade sour cream and pepper Jack. It was divine. The side salad was covered with thin slices of Asiago. A glass of dry champagne rounded out my meal.

I am grateful for this blessed time with my daughter. And 3872 steps and 20 flights of stairs (surely I will get a Fitbit badge for those stairs!) And I am grateful for the rain that drenched our parched region.

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