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SusanDolphinDelaney

Healing and Empowerment for Women

Monthly Archives: October 2014

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The October Art Bead Scene Challenge was based on a painting, “Autumn” by Milton Avery.

autumn-1944 Milton Avery

I made a sincere effort to create some beads from polymer that “went with” this challenge. I designed a necklace with 18 polymer beads and Swarovski pearls. Each bead seemed like a good idea at the time. They didn’t work, although I admit that I learned a lot about the clay in making them.

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Back to the drawing board. I had some beaded beads from Diana Costa Pedret from her Etsy shop Dicopebisuteria in Bacelona, Spain. You might have seen them in the previous post. I originally used the “blackberry” beads in a pendant, but they tangled terribly. So that is how the blackberry beads ended up in this challenge piece. I am not entirely happy with the rhythm of the piece and plan a slight restring of the necklace.

Blackberry Winter picks up the blues, magentas, whites and golds in the challenge painting.

I had fun with it. I have worn the necklace several times and have received compliments on it each time.

See the challenge and a collage of the entries at http://www.artbeadscene.blogspot.com.

You can also see the entries at http://www.pinterest.com/artbeadscene/jewelry-monthly-challenge-entries

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My post for the Earrings Everyday Challenge is just below this one. As you scroll down, check out the glow-in-the-dark earrings in this post.

Ginger Davis Allman of http://www.thebluebottletree.com challenged polymer clay artists to create new polymer objects with an eye to their reactivity under UV light. When she revealed that white Premo clay glowed under UV light, I was IN. I already had a cane, “Blackberry Flower” and had planned to make this pendant for a friend who loves pink. I made it, with faith in Ginger’s statement about the white Premo, even before my black light flashlight arrived. The beaded beads are from DiacopeSupplies on Etsy. Sonia made them for me. When my UV flashlight arrived, I took this photo:

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The translucent clay making up the flower petals glowed blue under UV! And the background, which had white Premo in it glowed white. The friend who I made this for is a nerd like me and likely will never wear the pendant under UV light.

I was on a roll now. I had long admired the bioluminescent algae Noctiluca scintillans, which inhabits shorelines and glows when waves disturb it. I made a cane resembling the cellular structure of Noctiluca, incorporating some glow-in-the-dark clay.

This picture shows the earrings I made, which are translucent, with light passing through them:

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I photographed the earrings in darkness, to show their glow-in-the-dark properties:

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How cool is that?

Next I photographed them under UV light (which was the challenge after all):

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I hope those photos tickle you as much as they tickle me.

I made up a batch of my Pele opal clay last weekend. I made some of it into a Pele goddess. Pele is the Hawaiian goddess of volcanos. I love that way she turned out:

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I decided to see how she looked under UV light, just for fun. Under a mix of incandescent and UV light that she looks like glowing embers:

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I thank my friend, Ginger Davis Altman, a fellow scientist and nerd, for this challenge.

I had a blast with it.

You can see the other challenge pieces at http://www.thebluebottletree.com

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Every month Erin Prais-Hintz of Earrings Everyday ( http://www.earrings-everyday.blogspot.com) gives us a challenge to spark our creativity.

This month Erin gave us some gorgeous marbled papers as a prompt.

I had just made a batch of my Pele clay so I marbled it into some black clay to make these earrings. Their reverse sides are as colorful and opalescent as their fronts. I used some AB Swarovski beads to complete my design.

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I also made this pair, marbling gold and silver clays into white pearl clay. I finished them with rice pearls.

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Recently I invited my daughter and my son-in-love to accompany me to a Reidel wine tasting.

I knew that Reidel made wine variety-specific glasses.

I wanted to find out more.

I admit that I walked into the tasting expecting that “varietal glasses” were simply a marketing ploy.

I could not have been more wrong.

Reidel glassware was founded in 1756 and is owned and managed by the tenth and eleventh generation of Reidels.

In 1973 Reidel began a collaboration with wine growers and its own taste scientists to develop glasses that brought out the best in each variety of wine. All of the glasses are “workshopped” by panels of wine growers, glassmakers and taste scientists. After determining from the vintners what aspects of the wine they hope to present to the taster, the glassblowers and taste scientists create a glass that will do just that.

Important considerations are the shape of the top of the glass. If the chemicals that make up the aroma of the wine (esters) are lightweight, the glass must have a rather closed-in top. The shape of the middle of the glass is important, too. The wine must be delivered to the portion of the tongue and mouth that can best taste the unique characteristics of the wine.

Who knew?

The Reidel staffer had us taste two whites and two reds. We tasted the first white in two different glasses. It tasted like a different wine in the cheap glass! The same thing happened when we tasted the second white in three different glasses (the cheap glass and the two different white wine Reidel glasses). You would never know it was the same wine in each glass! We tasted the first red in four glasses and the second red in all five glasses. Each time the wine tasted different in each glass.

Color me surprised.

At the end of the worksop the Reidel guy showed us a photo of the glass that Reidel had workshopped for Coca Cola. Two workshops were held in Atlanta at Coca Cola headquarters to find the shape of glass that would allow you to best taste “the real thing,”, to allow you to taste Coke the way that Coke is meant to taste. Both guys who know the secret formula for Coke were at each workshop.

The end product is the glass you see above.

Coca Cola Classic and Mexican Coke (made with sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup) both taste fantastic in the Reidel glass.

BTW, no ice is needed!

I got my Reidel Coke glasses from Amazon.

You can buy the high end Reidel mouth blown crystal glasses or Target has machine made Reidel glasses made in the exact shapes of the fine crystal. Both will deliver the proper flavor of the wine.

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